Home » Curriculum Development Grants

Curriculum Grants


Request for Proposals: Individual Course Grants

Request for Proposals: Course Sequence Grants

Past Grantee Case Studies

Apply Now

Curriculum Development Grants


IFYC is pleased to offer two kinds of Curriculum Development Grants to support faculty and institutions in their curricular engagement with interfaith studies- $1,000 Grants to faculty for the development or revision of a single course and $5,000 Grants to institutions for the creation of an interfaith studies course sequence (i.e. minor, major, certificate or concentration). See below for complete details about each grant.

Curriculum Grants


Request for Proposals: Individual Course Grants

Request for Proposals: Course Sequence Grants

Past Grantee Case Studies

Apply Now

Individual Course Grants

$1,000 grants to undergraduate faculty to create or revise a single course to include interfaith themes and pedagogies.  

Available to scholars in any discipline, these grants are intended for faculty interested in engaging the emerging field of interfaith studies in creative and rigorous ways. 

Grants will be awarded for curricular development to be conducted during the summer of 2020. Applications are due March 23, 2020 and the grant implementation will take place from May 1, 2020-August 30, 2020. The final deliverable for this grant is your revised syllabi.  

Before applying please review the grant details, including terms and requirements, in the Request for Proposals below. Any questions about the grants or the application process are welcome and should be addressed to Calvin Taylor, IFYC Program Manager, calvin@ifyc.org.

 

Apply Now

Examples of Past Grantees


On the Border: Immigration Justice in Interfaith Perspective

Miami University, Oxford, OH

How do religious and philosophical traditions inform and energize conversations and work on immigration justice? That’s the essential question the course ‘On the Border: Immigration Justice in Interfaith Perspective’ asks its students. Housed in the Sociology Department within the Social Justice Program, this course is developed and taught by an interdisciplinary and interfaith team of instructors, who draw upon the concept of “borders” as a central theme to introduce students to methods of ethical reasoning. Students analyze immigration as a complex justice issue and share how philosophical approaches such as deontology form the basis for the ways a secular humanist might ground their approach to justice. The course engages students through textual and interpersonal encounter with first person migrant and activist narratives, immersive learning at the border, and collaborative advocacy with interfaith activists around immigrant justice in local communities in Butler and Hamilton counties.

Business Communication and Report Writing

Community College of Aurora, Aurora, CO

The Community College of Aurora is home to students from over 60 countries representing diverse global world views. To examine business from a global perspective, adjunct instructor Julie Smith-Stewart designed the Business Communication and Report Writing course, offering students the opportunity to learn and explore their interfaith understanding. Through research projects, roundtable discussions, and service-learning trips, the students learn to share their knowledge with the broader campus community and engage religious and philosophical differences beyond the classroom with local businesses.

Word: Hip-Hop, Religion, and Poetry

Bethany College, Bethany, WV

Although hip-hop is not typically associated with religion and poetry, this course explores the connections and influences between these three seemingly disparate areas. It frames the religiosity of hip hop around Paul Tillich's theology of culture and his concept of ultimate concern. Students are encouraged to think of ways in which existentialist emcees deploy religious language and imagery to address their concern, finding points of commonality and contrast. Assistant Professor of Religion, Dr. Tyler Atkinson, designed this course to help students analyze the socio-historical significance of Christian theology or its sacred texts considering a contemporary problem of national or global significance. By more particularly on Black religious expression in America in tandem with new course content on the history of hip hop (particularly the influence of the Nation of Islam and Five Percenters on many of its early pioneers) the course spurs students to think about the crucial role of religion and art in activism concerning race in America.

World Religions, Pluralism, Secularism

Biola University, La Mirada, CA

Developed by assistant professor Dr. Michal Meulenberg, the World Religions, Pluralism, and Secularism course aims to help students (predominantly from an evangelical background) learn about the different world religions and - isms (secularism, humanism, etc.) and how to be working together with them for the common good. House in the School of Intercultural Studies, the course engages students in personal reflection, interfaith dialogue, and experiential learning to ensure interfaith work becomes a skill rather than just knowledge. It allows students to demonstrate integrative knowledge and skill across contributing streams of theology, history, social science, and strategy to work in diverse settings.

Martin Luther King and the Prophetic Traditions

Duke University, Durham, NC

This course offers an opportunity to study the interfaith context of some of the most formative movements in the 20th century: the American civil rights and black-led freedom movements. It brings together the way that the teachings of Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Rabbi Heschel were implemented in diverse (and competing) social movements and traces the lingering impact of these movements to today's context. Dr. Omid Safi, director of Duke Islamic Studies Center, developed the course upon a pre-existing one to move from a course largely focused on intellectual history and religious studies to a social movement one. Through the course he wishes to enable students to see contemporary movements as drawing inspiration from these earlier teachings, teachers, and movements.

Social Work and Spirituality

North Carolina A&T University, Greensboro, NC

This course is designed to prepare students for social work practice that recognizes the role of faith, spirituality and religion in the helping relationship. This course explores the interrelationship between matters of faith and spirituality and the biological, psychological, and social dimensions of our lived experience. Through this course, associate professor Joanne Hessmiller aims to enable students to develop relationships with the people they serve that includes the dimension of faith, spirituality and/or religion. Students in this course will examine the differences between organized religion and spirituality, explore a variety of religious traditions in the context of ethnicity and culture, and develop skills in interfaith dialogue.

Course Sequence Grants

$5,000 grants to undergraduate institutions to create an Interfaith Studies Course Sequence.  

As the field of Interfaith Studies continues to grow, increasing numbers of institutions are creating interfaith studies minors, majors, certificates, and concentrations. These programs seek to prepare students for interfaith civic leadership after graduation. IFYC is pleased to offer year-long grants to institutions ready to launch an interfaith studies program.

Applications are due March 23, 2020 and the grant implementation will take place from June 1, 2020 - June 1, 2021. The final deliverable for this grant is the final proposal that will be submitted to your institution for program approval.  

Before applying please review the grant details, including terms and requirements, in the Request for Proposals below. Any questions about the grants or the application process are welcome and should be addressed to Calvin Taylor, IFYC Program Manager, calvin@ifyc.org.

Apply Now

Examples of Interfaith Studies Course Sequences

Concordia College

Moorhead, MN

Interfaith Studies (minor)

The Interfaith Studies minor at Concordia is designed to give “students the knowledge and skills needed to engage a religiously diverse world and be literate global citizens.” Including a hands-on internship/practicum, the curriculum is designed to help graduates build peace and pluralism through mutual understanding.

Credit Hours Required: 21

Required Courses: Introduction to Interfaith Studies

Course examples: God: The Question and the Quest; Religion and the Postcolonial World; Black American History; Global Political Islam; Religion and Ecology

Department Home: Religion

Click here for full description of the program.

Shenandoah University

Winchester, VA

Religious Diversity and Leadership in the Professions (certificate program)

Shenandoah’s certificate program is designed to prepare students with the “knowledge, skills, and practical experience to navigate religious diversity,” and provides resources to understand and solve conflicts that may arise from religious diversity in the workplace. Bridging the academic study and pre-professional education, the courses in the program are constructed to engage civic life by training students to build community partnerships that promote civic collaboration and empower citizens to create solutions to issues plaguing their communities.

Credit Hours Required: 12

Required Courses: Navigating Religious Diversity; Religious Diversity and Civic Cooperation

Course examples: Religious and Film; Spirituality in Patient Care; Experiential Learning in Exercise Science; Media Ethics

Department Home: Religion

Click here for full description of the program.

Elizabethtown College

Elizabethtown, PA

Interfaith Leadership Studies (major)

Interfaith Leadership Studies at Elizabethtown College focuses on the intersections of religion, politics, and “everyday life” to form a lens with which students can view the world. The first of its kind, this program is interested in building leadership skills in addition to appreciative knowledge of other worldview traditions. Interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary in nature, this major pulls from courses across academic departments, including art history, biology, and creative writing. Students have access to dedicated partnerships with on-campus entities as well as off-campus organizations such as the White House Interfaith Community Service Challenge and IFYC.

Credit Hours Required: 42 credits

Required Courses: Conflict Dynamics and Transformation; Exploring Interfaith Leadership and Service; Comparative Theology and Interfaith Engagement; Capstone Seminar; Project in Interfaith Leadership Studies; Internship OR Junior-Senior Independent Research

Course Examples: Shared Scriptures of Jews and Christians; The Nonviolent Ethics of Martin Luther King Jr.; Modern Hinduism; History of Japanese Art and Aesthetics; World Music

Click here for full description of the program.