Pedagogy For Teaching Online That We Love

Our inboxes are filling up with resources to assist us in getting our courses, programs, trainings, and onboarding processes online now. This is a big task, and one that requires intentionality and time, which is currently in short supply. For this reason, I want to share five I truly found informative and insightful.

Top 5 Picks for Thriving in Online Classrooms

Dennis Large, Ed.D., Eric Calderon, Heidi Baynes, Steve Hickman, Ed.D., Mike Leffin
Lots of great resources! Spend some time in the pedagogy and practices portion as it is quite interesting as you become a virtual educator. Although there some similarities within person classroom instruction such as the need to be present and create opportunities for engagement, there are other aspects involved with teaching online that will be completely new. Do not fret, these resources are insightful and will assist you in navigating the online learning space like a champ.
 
Kevin Gannon
This article helps you feel adequate in jumping in feet first into something new, and cautious around the possible pitfalls. One gem the author mentions is Keep Teaching Virtual Community, from Katie Linder, executive director for program development at Kansas State University.
 
I for one learn by doing and watching. Check out Class Central and see how your colleagues are teaching, engaging, assessing and flourishing in their digital classrooms. If nothing else, check out their mini “class trailers.” Take what you like and leave what you don’t need.
 
Paul LeBlanc, President of Southern New Hampshire University
Paul outlines many useful resources including ones we might not prioritize in the haste of getting online. Take a moment to consider effective communication practices, creating your virtual presence, and establishing the discussion board as a vibrant, space for online engagement.
 
Tom Cavanaugh, University of Central Florida
Even before COVID-19, Tom Cavanagh has been leading this informative and witty podcast about Teaching Online. The episodes range from pedagogy and widgets to regulations and fees. If you have time for just one listen, I’d draw your attention to Episode 52: Higher Ed’s “Third Wave of Digital Leaders” that talks about coffee and digital sustainability with Kenneth C. Green. If you have Spotify, you can link directly here.
 
I’ll keep adding to this list as great new resources come in. If you have online pedagogy resources that are helping you to elevate your online instruction, let me know at janett@ifyc.org.

#Interfaith is a self-paced, online learning opportunity designed to equip a new generation of leaders with the awareness and skills to promote interfaith cooperation online. The curriculum is free to Interfaith America readers; please use the scholarship code #Interfaith100. #Interfaith is presented by IFYC in collaboration with ReligionAndPublicLife.org.

 

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The opinions contained in this piece are solely the author’s and do not necessarily reflect the views of Interfaith Youth Core. Interfaith America encourages a wide range of views and strives to maintain a respectful tone with a goal of greater understanding and cooperation between people of different faiths, worldviews, and traditions.