An America Where All May Feast


We find ourselves in a time of record levels of polarization while simultaneously witnessing historic heights of religious diversity in the United States. We all have a choice – allow increasing diversity to descend into dangerous conflict, discrimination and bigotry, or engage positively in a spirit of respect, relationship, and cooperation.

At IFYC, we are committed to building a truly interfaith America, where people of all different faiths, worldviews, and traditions are invited to the table to bring their unique contributions. The more distinct those contributions, the richer the feast for all.

Questions about giving? Contact the IFYC team any time: advancement@ifyc.org or (312) 261-4092.

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What Your Support Can Do


$100

can help send a student to the Interfaith Leadership Institute to gain the skills they need to build bridges on their campus

$500

helps an alum take their learning from We Are Each Other’s into community projects to build relationships across lines of difference

$1,000

enables staff and campus administrators to create program, training, and workshop opportunities that engage the intersection of race and interfaith cooperation

Related Resources


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