An America Where All May Feast


We find ourselves in a time of record levels of polarization while simultaneously witnessing historic heights of religious diversity in the United States. We all have a choice – allow increasing diversity to descend into dangerous conflict, discrimination and bigotry, or engage positively in a spirit of respect, relationship, and cooperation.

At IFYC, we are committed to building a truly interfaith America, where people of all different faiths, worldviews, and traditions are invited to the table to bring their unique contributions. The more distinct those contributions, the richer the feast for all.

Questions about giving? Contact the IFYC team any time: advancement@ifyc.org or (312) 261-4092.

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What Your Support Can Do


$100

can help send a student to the Interfaith Leadership Institute to gain the skills they need to build bridges on their campus

$500

helps an alum take their learning from We Are Each Other’s into community projects to build relationships across lines of difference

$1,000

enables staff and campus administrators to create program, training, and workshop opportunities that engage the intersection of race and interfaith cooperation

Related Resources


Musa explores and analyzes data related to the growing irreligiosity and declining religious affiliation in America.
The report, co-sponsored by IFYC and the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI), revealed higher rates of vaccin hesitancy among certain religious groups, including Hispanic Protestants, white evangelicals, and Black Protestants.
I noticed this year the Christian holiday Easter or Resurrection Sunday fell on the same day Martin Luther King was assassinated on April 4th. What people outside of the black community don’t realize is when an innocent life is lost it connects us...
Collaboration between religious officials and health care professionals — from both nonprofit and for-profit companies — has aided efforts to increase access to vaccinations.
As various communities consider the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines and navigate the physiological and psychological toll of the virus, town halls can be a space wherein community members can be presented with resources and accurate information.
A new survey conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) and Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) found that faith-based approaches can move many vaccine-hesitant communities toward acceptance.
While the motive for last week’s rampage remains under investigation, leaders and members of the Sikh community say they feel a collective trauma and believe more must be done to combat the bigotry, bias and violence they have suffered for decades.
"While we are delighted by the jury’s verdict, we are mindful that there’s still a lot of work ahead of us. Our criminal justice system remains deeply flawed." - Bishop T.D. Jakes, author and Dallas megachurch pastor
Anna, Racial Equity Media Fellow and Dean's Fellow at Harvard Divinity School (HDS), interviews Charlotte Zelle, a 3rd-year M.Div candidate at HDS, about how faith leaders can both prevent and respond to issues of intimate partner violence.